The cast-iron finials of Fraserburgh

During the 1860s Fraserburgh grew in size as a result of prosperity based on the herring fishery. This coincided with the eruption of cast-iron as a decorative medium for many sorts of buildings. The cherry-cocked villas which are a typical of the period were provided liberally with cast-iron railings, gates, and roof ornaments. The accessible structures were mostly taken down during the Second World War to be melted down for armaments, or because a later more austere taste found them excessively flamboyant.

Fraserburgh is fortunate in retaining one superb example of the Victorian cast-iron aesthetic in the drinking-fountain. But the finials on the roofs being relatively inaccessible survive to make the roofscapes spikily fascinating.

The images may also be viewed as a slideshow.

Fraserburgh: Drinking fountain Fraserburgh: The temperance fountain Fraserburgh: The temperance fountain Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial
Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial and ornament Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial
Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial
Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial
Fraserburgh: Cast-iron finial Fraserburgh: A cast-iron finial

(Revision date: Sunday 21st March 2010)

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